Why I’m quitting my job as a driver and moving to Hawaii

I started my career as a service technician and driver for a major transportation company in Hawaii.

I have no regrets about it.

Now, I’m a business owner.

I don’t like to talk about my financial woes, but I’ve never been able to pay myself off and the credit cards I have have are in bad shape.

I’m working on a retirement plan, and I’m not going to take that anymore.

The only way I’m going to retire is on my own terms, and that’s how I’ve built a business that I love.

I’d like to see that trend continue, and when I retire, I’d rather be working for myself than for a corporation.

Truck driver loses job in Ohio after failing drug test

A truck driver lost his job in his home state of Ohio after testing positive for marijuana and failing to follow a strict drug test protocol, the Associated Press has learned.

The driver of the vehicle was fired after the state Department of Licensing and Regulation found he failed a test in November, said spokeswoman Nicole Molnar.

Molnar said the driver was charged with one count of manufacturing, distribution and possession of marijuana.

The driver had been working as a trucker for the last three years.

The company said it is cooperating with the investigation and would cooperate with any other state or federal law enforcement agency.

The trucker’s lawyer, Michael W. Pomerantz, declined comment.

Ohio has about 1,000 licensed drivers, but only about 300 of them are required to take a drug test.

State records show that driver was suspended in November for a failure to comply with the state’s strict drug-testing protocols.

He had been on probation for a drug charge, and had completed two weeks of substance abuse counseling.

The Associated Press did not immediately have details about the specific nature of the alleged drug offense.

Molina said the trucker had been a driver for the company since 2006.

He was fired in March.

He told the Associated Statesman that the company was not aware of the drug test until it came to light.

He said his client was not an employee of the company, and that he was never given any training on how to follow the rules of the state of New York.

He said the company would review the case with the State Liquor Control Board, and if found to have violated the law, would take appropriate disciplinary action.

Molson said she could not say how long the driver’s job would be in jeopardy.

She said she was unaware of any pending criminal charges.

Molina said that the state has been working with the Department of Public Health and Human Services, the Department